Women In Tech! We have a special remote episode of Labs LIVE! Guest hosts Erika and Chrissy cover all things #womenintech: Leaning in (or not), balancing family life, and how they make it all work. Full transcript below.

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Dan Ward:

All right. Welcome back to Labs Live. Tobi, how are you?

Tobi:

Pretty good. Pretty good. This week went by pretty fast.

Dan Ward:

What was that now?

Tobi:

This week seems like it went by pretty fast. I can’t believe it’s Thursday already.

Dan Ward:

Yeah. Yeah. I’ve got kids at home. I don’t necessarily agree with that. But, that’s lovely. I do see you have a level of music studio going on and I’m still concerned why you are not playing us in or out of any of these shows. It would be really nice.

Tobi:

By request only.

Dan Ward:

Okay. All right. So, welcome back to Labs Live. We have not been producing this show for, I think it’s been a couple months now, I think. We had this show, in particular, the Women In Tech show ready to go for quite some time. And we held off for a while. We wanted to understand what was going on in the world around us, specifically with COVID and when it would be the right time to do this show. We also held off a little bit because we were figuring out the technology.

Thankfully, we kind of have that down. We’ve done some live streams sense. And we’re ready to go with this show. So it’s exciting. Let me give you kind of a flavor of what the show will be, but first make sure that you go to all of our social channels, like us on the social channels. Actually, more follow us. Like content if you actually enjoy it. But, follow us. On LinkedIn, make sure you follow us. So you get the notifications when we do go live. Same thing with YouTube. And then we also put out content on Instagram, Twitter. Tobi, sometimes you’re on our Instagram, right?

Tobi:

Yeah, on the Gram.

Dan Ward:

 You don’t have Facebook?

Tobi:

Just Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, and that’s it.

Dan Ward:

I don’t have Facebook either, if I’m being honest. But that said, all right. So Tobi, since you and I are not necessarily in this show, we’re only in the intro, kind of. I’m going to put you backstage. That’s what this little tool puts you to a backstage.

Tobi:

I go hang out.

Dan Ward:

I am going to turn the reins over as well for a very special episode. I’m going to turn it over to Erika and Chrissy. They’re going to take it from there. I’m going to be backstage as well. And we’ll probably pop in at some point in time. Maybe when Erika tells me I should. And or if we get some good questions on either YouTube or LinkedIn, we’ll pop in and I can ask those to Erika and Chrissy. So Tobi, I will talk to you later.

Tobi:

See ya.

Dan Ward:

Erika, Chrissy, welcome.

Erika Languirand:

Hello, thank you.

Dan Ward:

And I believe, Erika, I’m handing the reins over to you, right?

Erika Languirand:

That’s me.

Dan Ward:

All right. I’ll be backstage. Have fun.

Erika Languirand:

Thanks a lot, Dan. All right, Chrissy, do we want to start by introducing ourselves?

Chrissy:

Let’s do it.

Erika Languirand:

All right. You go first.

Chrissy:

All right. We’ll pass the baton. I am Chrissy. I work as a Delivery Lead at Detroit Labs. I’ve been there for a little over a year now. What about you, Erika?

Erika Languirand:

I’m Erika Languirand. I’m the Director of People Development at Detroit Labs. And I’ve been at Labs for going on seven years at this point. So hang out for a while now. So happy belayed Women’s History Month.

Chrissy:

Yes.

Erika Languirand:

To you and everybody else.

Chrissy:

Yes.

Erika Languirand:

As Dan mentioned, this episode was rescheduled. While we, as a company, have focused on our team members wellbeing and the health of our business through the first few weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic. Chrissy and I continue to prioritize supporting our teams on a daily basis right now, as we all navigate this challenging new world together. But we’re so happy to be here today to talk about women in tech. So I’ll be honest, when the idea for this episode came up, I thought, “Well, what’s left to say?” And for me it’s because I talked a whole lot about women in tech at the beginning of my career in technology, which is now almost a decade ago. And then without really thinking about it, I kind of stopped.

And I think that’s because I was focused on different things. I’ve spent a lot of time on the work of bringing women into this field, and supporting and coaching them as they’ve grown their careers. And I’ve also dedicated a lot of time and energy to learning from others, especially these last few years in building a broader understanding of diversity, and equity and inclusion in the tech industry. But in talking with you, as we got started working in this episode of Labs Live, I actually got really excited to revisit this topic again with the benefit of that experience and perspective.

And of course, to learn about your stories, and your experience and perspective. And the research that we did preparing for this episode reminded me, of course, that we, as an industry still have a very long way to go. So with that in mind, Chrissy. Do you want to share some of the stats on women in tech, in the industry today that we found during our research?

Chrissy:

Sure thing. So a lot of the research that we found says that there are more women in tech, but it’s not complete parity there yet. When you break it down by background and race, there’s only 3% of black women in tech, 1% of Latinx women in tech. And then it goes down from there, to 0.03% for indigenous women. So definitely a lot of work that still needs to be done around the diversity and inclusion part of women in tech. But we do have way more of a presence than we did 10 years ago when you were just getting your start. So I can only imagine what things looked like back then.

Erika Languirand:

Yeah. So the numbers are kind of a little depressing still. And I think one of the studies I’ve read said, women went from holding about 36% of computing jobs in 1991, and that’s gone downhill since then. And it’s now down to in the 20s somewhere. We also did some research on stats around pay gaps and around how women leave the industry. So we’ll talk more about that later, but those numbers are also kind of discouraging. Although, having said all that, Chrissy and I are not going to try to solve all the industry’s gender diversity and inclusion problems in 20 minutes.

Chrissy:

I don’t think we can.

Erika Languirand:

I don’t think so, no. I mean, we’re pretty smart, but what we would like to do is share a little bit about our own journeys as women in tech. And talk about how our experiences and our stories fit those statistics. And then to wrap up, we’ll share some of the work that we’ve done at Detroit Labs over the years to grow and support women on our team. And offer some suggestions for what you can do in your own community and your own workplace. So with that, Chrissy, we’re going to talk about you some more. How did you get into the tech industry and what led you to pursue a career in tech?

Chrissy:

Oh my gosh. So it was a very windy road for me. When I went off to school, I thought I was going to be in advertising. I was going to be a Mad Woman type of situation going on there. And then I kind of ended up working in automotive. And somewhere in between that time also started a business with friends. We started a personal concierge service, and we were like 23 and we’re like, we have $1,000 put together, and we need to make marketing materials, we need advertising, we need a website, everything. So I took on the job of creating a website for our business. And while doing that, I went down a rabbit hole of, what is HTML and CSS? And that’s the thing from the MySpace days.

Erika Languirand:

Yes.

Chrissy:

So I’m just going down all these rabbit holes, I put the site together. And after that, I found that I still enjoyed what I learned. And so I found Code Academy and Free Code Camp. And I started doing tutorials on there and kind of making simple small projects once a week. And shortly after that, I heard about Grand Circus. And I wasn’t sure if I was ready at that point, but I kind of kept my ear to the street to see what was going on with that. And a year later I ended up interviewing and got into the Front End Bootcamp at Grand Circus. And that’s where my journey started. I was like, “Okay, I can do this. I think I can do coding. This can work.” And things completely changed. Now, I’m doing zero coding these days. And working on the client facing side of technology.

Erika Languirand:

Yeah. Talk a little bit more about that and what you’re doing currently. I mean, if you can, talk to us about how mentorship played a part in that part of your journey.

Chrissy:

Sure, sure. I think it was a really interesting time for tech in Michigan. When I was going through this process, it was 2016, 2017. And we weren’t looked at as a hub for technology like your Silicon Valley’s, your New York’s and stuff like that. So everything was tight knit. And luckily, during my time in bootcamp and shortly after I was able to find groups of women, like enclaves of women that were working in tech. And so there was, LyDev, Girl Develop It, Sister Code, everything like that. And I was able to just find women that were doing what I was trying to do in my career. And they were all completely open to put me in contact with people or helping me along the way, as long as I was willing to ask. And that’s actually how I met you, Erika.

Erika Languirand:

Hey. Well, I’m going to tell that story because it’s a really fun one. We, of course Grand Circus is our neighbor right down the street, and one of their team members reached out and said, “Hey, we have this wonderful graduate who is looking to get into a delivery lead role.” Which is kind of our project management, account management, client facing, team leading, do everything, bosses at Detroit Labs. But she said, “Is there somebody at Detroit Labs who could maybe talk to Chrissy about this role?” And so, I reached out to our delivery lead team. And of course, one of them got right back to me and said, “Yeah, I’ll totally talk to somebody about the industry and about this role. That’s great.” And so that’s how Chrissy met Jackie. Jackie Michael, one of our delivery leads. And the two of them started talking. And Chrissy, then what?

Chrissy:

I met with Jackie a couple of times and we just did some workshopping. and a few months down the line, she sent me a message like, “Hey, we’re looking for delivery leads. Would you be interested?” And I’m like, “You know what? I think I would be, and I’m going to apply.” And I don’t know where I would be if that connection wouldn’t have been made. People get put into your life for reasons. And I’m so grateful that I met the both of you.

Erika Languirand:

And here you are at Detroit Labs. So now just a little over a year. So now that you’re in the industry, what’s it like? What sort of challenges do you experience, both externally and then also internally?

Chrissy:

Yeah. So now I’ve been in the field for about three years now. And I will say that it’s not what I expected at all. What you see on TV is very like bro-y, and foosball tables, and beer taps and all kinds of things like that. We have fun, but that is not the center of our company at all, or any of the tech companies that I’ve had the pleasure to work for. And so I was really surprised to see that. And that there is space to be myself at work. I don’t feel like I need to kind of assimilate into maleness, per se. So, that was cool.

The one thing, I just want to see more women in development roles in more of the specific roles. A lot of the time you see women, they’re in tech, but they kind of get put into the categories of kind of doing the work to make things happen, not building the things per se. So definitely there’s still, like I said, there’s still a gap for women of color there and non-binary folk. So definitely would like to see more of that in the next two to five years.

Erika Languirand:

Yeah.

Chrissy:

Preferably less time.

Erika Languirand:

Yeah. That’s really interesting. Because if you look at the numbers of women in tech, I think it’s about 30% across big tech companies and smaller ones. But then when you actually look at the number of women in specific project management in software engineering, in those roles that are actually related to software delivery, it’s down even further. It’s anywhere from 10 to 20%. So it’s even smaller in those cases.

Chrissy:

Yeah.

Erika Languirand:

Yeah. So it’s important to me that we talk about intersectionality and acknowledge that being a woman in tech is not a monolithic experience. Much like being a woman in the world, it looks very different, depending on your other identities. You touched on this a little bit when you shared the statistics for women of color versus white women holding tech roles. And for me, one of the biggest aspects of growth in my own journey over the years has been the recognition that, while there’s ways in which I am uniquely challenged as a woman in the industry, there are other ways in which I am uniquely privileged as a white woman in the industry. So we talked about being a woman in tech. As a black woman in tech, how is your experience different? And what does the world look like for you? And what kind of stories do you carry around with yourself?

Chrissy:

I think for myself, there’s just been the experience of often being the only one in the room. There’s more, I would say black male developers that I’ve seen since I’ve been in the industry. And then I’m starting a new job and I’m the first one there. And they’re like, “Wow.” So, that’s the main thing. And then just kind of struggling with the imposter syndrome and making it clear to myself, I’m supposed to be here, I did the work, I went through all of this stuff, I’m meant to be here. And just having that self talk with myself as often as possible when the going gets tough.

Erika Languirand:

Yeah. I think that was one of the hardest things when I got into the industry was there were almost never any other women in the room and there were definitely almost never any other people in the room who were new to the industry. And I was both of those things. So I just felt like I stuck out like a sore thumb all of the time. And as I said, there’s still a lot of ways in which I blend in. I definitely, there was always that thought that like, “Okay, if I raise my hand and I say the wrong thing, it’s not just going to be, Erika is bad at this. It’s going to be, women are not good programmers.”

Chrissy:

Yeah. It’s kind of like the stereotype threat going on there.

Erika Languirand:

Yeah. It’s a lot to carry with you. For sure.

Chrissy:

Yeah.

Erika Languirand:

Okay. So I’ve just bombarded you with questions. Do you have anything to throw back at me before we jump on here?

Chrissy:

Yes.

Erika Languirand:

Okay.

Chrissy:

You were speaking about different intersectional identities. So I’m wondering about your different identities and one of them being you’re a new mom. So what has your experience being a woman in tech and also a mom that is working in tech been?

Erika Languirand:

So being a woman in tech, it was interesting. My very first job as a software developer, I was brand new. I literally could not code my way out of a paper bag. And I was the only woman on the development team at my first company, at my first job. And it actually, the rest of the developers that I worked with were wonderful. And they spent so much time and energy coaching me, and teaching me, and I had a great experience. But there were kind of funny jokes about how the bathroom in the building was my personal bathroom, because there were literally no other women.

Somebody would come in and they would assume that I was the secretary or whatever it was, there was a lot of the little stuff that you hear about. But I was having such a positive experience across the board that I really didn’t… Or I told myself it didn’t matter. And then I came to Labs and there was just one other woman developer at the time. But it made a huge difference, because having your own bathroom is cool. But having someone to talk to in the bathroom was way better than that. So right away, I noticed how all of a sudden, I didn’t feel like, okay, not every single thing I do is representative of all women, because there’s at least one other woman here. And that was just one. Now we’re at a point, and I dreamed about this, and now I love that it’s real. I can’t offhand name all the women at Labs. If you asked me to do it right now, there’s 56 of us. I couldn’t do it.

Chrissy:

Yeah. Seriously.

Erika Languirand:

And so to have seen that over the last seven years has been really rewarding and really cool, because every day it makes me feel like I get to bring myself to work. And my goal for us is to be a company where everybody gets to have that. And I see us moving closer and closer to that. But as far as being a mom, my son is going to be one in about 10 days, which is wild. And for me, there was this massive shift in my professional career, because all of a sudden my job wasn’t my biggest job anymore. My career was my baby for the better part of a decade. And then along came this little person who was amazing, but he basically kicked my world into the sun.

Being a mom, turned upside down my identity, my priorities, my body, definitely my sleep schedule. I used to be somebody who would just put in an 80 hour work week at the drop of a hat. No problem. If I was like, “This needs to get taken care of.” That’s what I’m going to do. Okay, great. And I love my work. So it never even felt like a strain necessarily. I have less ability to do that now. So I think that we go in a lot of circles in life. And for me, it’s a lot of relearning how to prioritize, how to delegate and say no. How to be really intentional and efficient with my time. I thought I had all those skills. Being a working mom meant I had to take them to a whole different level. And if I didn’t have the support and flexibility that I have at Labs, I can’t imagine how I would do it.

I can take my son to the pediatrician in the middle of the day. I can flex my hours, so I get more time with him during the week. I can work remote if he’s sick. And I guess I talk about all the joys and challenges of raising a tiny human with a community of other Labers, who all know what it’s like to be a working parent. Without all of that, I think I would be so much less happy and less fulfilled, both in my work and in my life. So in a way that’s always been one of the things that has made me want to encourage other women to get into the industry. Because when you land in the right place, there can be so much flexibility. And a lot of these roles you can work from anywhere in the world. And you can do that thing where you have time to have both a family and a career. So it’s not easy, and it’s a lot of time, and it’s a little less sleep than I used to get a few years ago, but it’s been pretty magical.

Chrissy:

Do you have a tip for what a woman looking to get into tech or that’s currently in tech, but not in a position or a job that’s as flexible as Labs, what should they look for if they’re looking for a new company to work for? What would you say would be the biggest thing to look for?

Erika Languirand:

I would say … I’m actually going to borrow this from people who have joined Labs over the years, because I always ask them, what makes them think this is the company for them? Come in and look for people who look like you, who share maybe your identities, who have the kind of life that you want to have, who are sort of living the same story that you want to live. And if they’ve chosen to be at that company, that’s a sign that it might be a good spot for you. There’s a million more questions to ask after for that. But that’s kind of what I think about. I remember I had an apprentice tell me a few cohorts ago, she said, “This is the first tech company I’ve ever come to where I was interviewed by another black woman. And that was a huge thing for me.”

And that was a huge thing for me. When I was interviewed at Labs, I was interviewed by another woman. It made an impression. It made me go, “I can see you here. So maybe I can see me here.” So I think that’s a big thing.

Chrissy:

Love it.

Erika Languirand:

Yeah. So let’s talk about how we’ve grown at Labs over the years. And some of the things that we do to support women. So when I started, we were at about 40 people. And as I said, I was one of two women developers and there were five women on the team total. So we were at 5% women developers. Now we’re at 26. Which we’re really proud of. We were at 12% women total. Now we’re at 39%. It’s not, but we’ve more than tripled our percentage of women on the team. And we have quintupled, is that a word?

Chrissy:

You made it a word. It’s fine.

Erika Languirand:

Our percentage of women developers. So it’s a whole lot of positive growth over a period of six years. One thing that I’m really proud of is that of our women team members, 40% are women of color. So we’ve still got work to do there, but that’s a number that makes me really happy in my heart. Our leadership team also includes two women. And that matters to me a lot, because women in leadership often have the experience of being token, feeling like there’s only one woman seat at the table, which sets up to compete with each other instead of benefiting from having a collaborative relationship as fellow women leaders. So those are some of the things that are exciting to me. What do you think/ what do you think we do for women in tech at Labs?

Chrissy:

Oh my gosh. First, I was so excited when the picture went up for women’s month photo and there wasn’t even all the women in the company. We have a lot. If you’re not counting the bigger companies, for a small tech company, we have a nice amount of women of all different ethnicities, backgrounds. And that is something that excited me the most about working at Labs. I knew a couple of women just being out and about, networking and stuff, that worked at Labs. But I had no idea that this utopia was possible. It feels like a unicorn company in a way. But, I love just seeing the growth of the women in our company. And even hearing more about your story. You started out as a developer at Labs, and over time now you are one of the two women that are on the leadership team.

And that’s amazing. And that there is a pathway to get to leadership or whatever it is that you want to do at Labs. There is a path to do that. You’re not kind of just forgotten about. A lot of times it’s kind of that lean-in, lean-out situation, where it’s like, okay, you need to thrust yourself into the forefront so that the people in these seats, they see you, and then you could possibly become one of these women in leadership. But, we kind of have it where anyone, like these opportunities are open for anyone at the company if you put forth the work. People are invested in you. You have mentors, you have guides. Our team of People Development Team is very hands-on. I love it.

Erika Languirand:

Yeah. You mentioned the lean-in thing. And I remember, I read Lean In at a very different point in my career. And I was like, “Yeah. I just got to work harder.”

Chrissy:

Yes.

Erika Languirand:

I’ve learned a lot since then. I think that’s some other advice for women who are looking to get into the industry, looking to go to a new company. Look for women in leadership, because that means there’s a path for you. It means there’s a path forward. Look for women who are doing the jobs that you want to be doing. Because it’s not just how hard you work. There’s also be support and encouragement within the company. And I do think that we have that. I did a lot of speaking at conferences a couple of years ago. So I traveled all over the world and met people from a whole bunch of different companies and different countries.

And I was always a little bit like, I think that we kind of have a bubble in some ways at home. We do not do everything perfectly. We have lots to learn. But there is some things that we do really well that I just forget aren’t true everywhere else. And so, I go to conferences and people would just assume that I was there to recruit, or that I was there with my husband. I got asked that a lot. And I’d be like, “I’m speaking.” It always surprised me, even though I know the industry is like that, because it’s not necessarily the experience that we have here. So it’s an interesting dichotomy for me when I’m out in the industry going to events versus when I’m at Labs. And I feel like we definitely are on the right track towards the things that I want us to be.

Chrissy:

Yeah.

Erika Languirand:

Yeah.

Chrissy:

We’re as close to perfect as we can. We’ll put a disclaimer at the bottom.

Erika Languirand:

Yeah. So some of the things that I think have made a difference for us, our apprenticeship program … across the board apprentice programs are about 50% women every time we do a class. And so the numbers hold up really nicely there. So we create opportunities for women to get into the industry. We have a professional development group for women in tech, which is really cool. It let’s talk about kind of our experiences, positive and negative, because there are both. We have a lot of mentorship and support opportunities available. And we sponsor conferences in the industry and specifically diversity sponsorships to try to get those opportunities to people who are looking for them. So we have a lot of activities going on. So if people want to get involved, if they want to check out some cool women in tech organizations, or they just maybe want to be a better ally in their next meeting, what are some things they can do?

Chrissy:

That’s a good one. I think just things have changed since I’ve been on the networking road. But a lot of them, I would say Sister Code is a great one.

Erika Languirand:

Yes.

Chrissy:

I love that one. There’s a Tech Ladies group. It’s on Facebook. We did have a hub in Michigan, but I’m not sure what’s going on with that one right now. But you can definitely join the Facebook group, Tech Ladies. If you want to kind of learn how to code, if you want to take this into a career or you just want to learn a new skill, there’s things like Coding with Klossy, which is kind of geared towards the younger demographic. But we want to get girls back into STEM. We want to get our percentages up in the next 10 years. So that’s a good start. There’s just the Code Academy, Free Code Camp, things like that.

But you can also just kind of seek out this information by looking into Facebook groups, just a Google search. Twitter is great. The women in tech hashtag is always very resourceful. There’s several YouTube channels. Just to see if this is something you would be interested in, or if you’re already there, new things, new companies, new people. Just meeting more women in tech. That’s always awesome. So those are my recommendations.

Erika Languirand:

All right. Okay. Well, we’re going to be wrapping up here in a minute. So my last question for you is what’s your favorite thing about being a woman in the tech industry?

Chrissy:

My favorite thing. I would say that it’s kind of, still for women, it’s still like the Wild, Wild West. So there’s no path carved out for you. This is what you have to do and there’s still room to create opportunities for yourself and pretty much do what you want to do. If there’s something that you’re interested in, you can go after it. If the opportunity isn’t available, you can make the opportunity for yourself. And find other women that would want to help you in this goal that you have. And it’s a great community. So, that’s my favorite part.

Erika Languirand:

Awesome. Well, my favorite part is literally this conversation that we’re having. Well, it’s because it went from, here’s an email, to here’s this random person, to this person’s amazing, to now this person works with me, to now we’re sitting here having this conversation.

Chrissy:

Yes.

Erika Languirand:

And I’ve gotten to have so many of those connections over the years. I think there’s something really special about women in the industry connecting and supporting each other for the growth of everybody’s career.

Chrissy:

Yeah. I really love being in that position now. Being able to kind of help pull the next woman up, that’s where I get my joy from. I love seeing the people that I talk with or give some advice to, just seeing where they go in the next six months to a year. And seeing them do it for someone else. That’s awesome and amazing.

Erika Languirand:

That’s great. All right, Dan.

Dan Ward:

Erika, Chrissy, how are you?

Erika Languirand:

Hi.

Dan Ward:

That was good timing to jump in?

Erika Languirand:

That was perfect. I was about to summon you.

Dan Ward:

I’m going to bring Tobi back in, too here. I do have one question as we wrap it up here. As a male colleague, how can we best be allies? What can we do to be an ally and be supportive in some way, shape or form?

Erika Languirand:

I’ve got one for that. So I think for me, we talked a little bit about mentorship earlier on, there’s mentorship and then there’s sponsorship. Men tend to hold the higher up positions in the tech industry in most companies. And so, one really big thing that was a huge difference maker for me is one of our co-founders, Nathan Hughes, decided that he was going to basically sponsor me, and help me grow my career, and do that really intentionally. He invested a ton of time, energy into what he thought was my potential. Hopefully, I haven’t let him down too badly. But, I would not be where I am in my career without that. So, just paying attention, and maybe investing time, and energy, and support in somebody who doesn’t look like you can go a really long way and make a huge difference for someone’s career.

Dan Ward:

All right.

Chrissy:

Yeah. And I would second that. And just add, just being an advocate. And if you see an opportunity to advance a woman, if it’s just a meeting or something, to make sure that women’s voices are being heard in these capacities. I’m sure you all have heard about mansplaining and stuff like that, so being very cognizant of the women in the room, and making sure that those ideas are coming forth, and kind of helping that along the way. Or if a woman does provide an idea, just saying like, “Hey, Sheila said this. That was really great. So we should kind of explore that idea a little bit more.”

Dan Ward:

Awesome. Well, I’m sure Tobi probably feels the same. But, thank you.

Tobi:

Yeah.

Dan Ward:

You both did an amazing job and what a great conversation. I know we were sitting in the backstage area and then also talking on Slack, just commenting on how great this was. The feedback on both LinkedIn and YouTube support that as well. And I think our goal for this was to have a candid conversation. And I certainly feel like that that was achieved here. So thank you, Erika. Thank you, Chrissy.

Tobi:

Thank you both.

Dan Ward:

As we wrap up Labs Live here, I don’t know for sure when the next Labs Live specific show will be, but I do know we are streaming tomorrow at 1:00 PM. Right, Tobi?

Tobi:

Yes. 1:00 PM.

Dan Ward:

For our Friday 15.

Tobi:

Yes.

Dan Ward:

And go ahead.

Tobi:

Yeah, 15 minutes of just having conversations with our colleagues at Labs. It could be anything. We just ask random questions and try to have fun for 15 minutes.

Chrissy:

It’s a good time.

Dan Ward:

We just share a link to our main Slack channel. Whoever wants to join can join. And last time I think we asked questions about favorite TV shows, favorite toys growing up, early bird night, owl, things like that. The hard hitting questions you really want to know. But it’s an opportunity to have a little bit of fun and wrap up Friday. So with that said, make sure you go to our social channels, make sure you subscribe on YouTube, follow us on LinkedIn, so you know when we do these things. Because with LinkedIn, we can’t really send a link out. It just pops up when you’re logged in. And I think that’s it. So again, Erika, Chrissy, thank you. Tobi, thank you.

Tobi:

Thank you.

Dan Ward:

Thank you for tuning in and we will see you later. Bye.

Erika Languirand:

Bye.

Tobi:

Bye.